Used Panty Vending Machines and other Bulls#!+

In respone to the comments to this post on Digg.com:

Repeat after me: There are no used panty vending machines in Japan. The third most common vending machines after soft drinks and smokes aren’t the ones for porn. We don’t have supermarkets staffed by robots. You don’t see “many many bars and other services that have big signs saying ‘NO FOREIGNERS’.” Are the Japanese “beta testers for future technology”? I don’t think so. At least not the ones in my neighborhood.

How I Became a Lifer

For someone who hardly ever talks, I sure talked a lot tonight. I found a printout of some questions someone e-mailed me back in January. Did I already answer them? If I did, did I give the same answers this time as last time?

Someone is going to mention this, so I’ll do it first. You know, I, like, you know, say “you know” too much. You know? Chances are you already know.

Let’s make it into a game. Wherever you are when you listen to this episode, every time I say “you know,” punch a random bystander in the face. Send me photos of the hilarity that ensues, and the person with the best photo will win a prize.
Music:

Obadiah Parker

Methlab Production

P.S. Wow, so far 90 people downloaded the 200MB hires version of Tony’s vlog. That’ll make him very happy. And I’ve only used 2% of my Dreamhost bandwidth. Merely a flesh wound. What surprises me the most is that it means I have at least 90 listeners. I only ever imagine around four, and that’s including my mother.

Street Live: Cross

Cross Last Friday night on the way home I came across a duo playing outside Shinjuku Station. They’ve got the typical J-Pop sound that makes all the OL’s (office ladies) swoon. Well, in theory at least. No CD yet, but their home page is here.

Chinese Whispers about Japan

This interesting little factoid, dear listeners, is an extreme–but common–exaggeration. It showed up on digg.com this morning.

15 million Japanese No Longer Use Paper Money EVER

Today, however, for 15 million Japanese, paper money is a thing of the past, according to the Japan Research Institute. No longer solely used for online purchases, e-money, accessed via a smart card or mobile phone, has become a way of life for many consumers in Japan.

read more | digg story